Month: August 2016

Breast Cancer Treatment Breakthrough Claimed by 16-Year-Old Boy

Krtin Nithiyanandam is hoping to gain interest from the scientific community to develop the work further A 16-year-old boy claims to have discovered the cure for one of the most dangerous forms of breast cancer. Krtin Nithiyanandam from Epsom, Surrey, believes he has found a way to turn the most deadly form of triple negative breast cancer into one which is responsive to treatment. The teenager, who won the Google Science Fair in 2015 for creating an Alzheimer’s test which can spot early signs of the disease, has been working on the therapy in his school lab. “Most cancers have...

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Junior Doctors Victory in Cape increases the Pressure on Government

SA Health is under pressure urgently to reduce the working hours of junior doctors nationally following Western Cape Health’s decision to slash maximum shifts from 30 to 24 hours. The Junior Doctors Association of SA was celebrating the decision – but the ultimate solution was more doctors. Junior doctors have waged a voluble campaign against what they believe are dangerously long shift hours, among other issues, echoing similar protest movements by young doctors in countries such as the United Kingdom and India. Last weekend Western Cape Health MEC Nomafrench Mbombo announced the reduction in continuous working hours for interns, saying that while working...

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Tax could offer hope in SA’s obesity crisis

SOUTH AFRICANS are facing health risks because of obesity. This is increasing at an alarming rate as a result of the consumption of sugary drinks. Professor Karen Hofman, director of Priceless South Africa, says the findings of research they have conducted show that inaction over the intake of sugary drinks could lead to a growing obesity epidemic. She says projections indicate that by 2017, there will be an additional 1,2 million obese adults in South Africa, with more than a quarter of this due to increased intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). According to Hofman, an estimated 70% of women...

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Top 10 Health Tips for Women from WebMD

Let’s face it, ladies: Doctor visits are short. And they’re getting shorter. What if your doctor had more time? She might tell you the same things that OB-GYN Alyssa Dweck, MD wants you to know. Consider Dweck’s tips and prescriptions for a lifetime of wellness.   1. Zap your stress. “The biggest issue I see in most of my patients is that they have too much on their plates and want to juggle it all. Stress can have significant health consequences, from infertility to higher risks of depression,anxiety, and heart disease. Find the stress-reduction method that works for you and...

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Women’s Health in the Spotlight this Women’s Month

Velisha Thompson of the City of Johannesburg writes: Higher rates of cancer, diabetes and heart disease and other ailments in women are still a huge reality. This is despite the availability of more resources to help people understand their personal health and wellness needs. For the month of women, their health takes centre stage as I look at the two most common cancers in women – breast and cervical cancer. Breast cancer Breast cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancerous) cells are found in breast tissues. Each breast has 15 to 20 sections called lobes, which have many...

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Medical Tests Every Woman Needs to Be Healthy for Life

You exercise, eat right and get plenty of sleep -— great! But if you’re only going to the doctor’s office when you think you have a cold or need a refill on your birth control, you’re missing out on a huge area of preventative health. Having regular check-ups and routine screenings and tests can help you catch health problems and help you avoid a full-blown health crisis years down the road. So to help you take control of your health, here are the tests every woman should have done in her 20s, 30s, 40s, 50s and 60s.   Medical...

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Continuity Saves Lives – Here’s Proof

Research has proven what Australian GPs have long been saying about the importance of continuity of care. A prospective study proves what Australian GPs have long known – having a regular GP saves lives. The Dutch study, published in the British Journal of General Practice, provides the strongest evidence yet that continuity of care in general practice is associated with a lower mortality rate. The trial of 1712 adults aged 60 or over found those with multiple GPs were 20% more likely to die over the 17-year study period than those who attended a single doctor. On the other...

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UKZN in groundbreaking HIV antibody study

The University of KwaZulu-Natal-based Centre for the Aids Programme of Research in South Africa has partnered with the US National Institute of Health to manufacture an antibody against HIV infection, the Sunday Times reports. Acclaimed HIV/Aids expert Professor Salim Abdool Karim said that the human studies will start in the middle of next year following promising results when the antibody from the 27-year-old KZN woman was successfully tested on monkeys. The mother of two – known as CAP 256 to protect her identity – tested HIV-positive in 2005. “We have taken the antibody that she was making and genetically engineered it...

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Hormones and Genetics Put Women at Greater Risk for Arthritis

In 2014, 26.5 percent of women reported having doctor-diagnosed arthritis, compared with 20.5 percent of men, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention behavioral risk survey. Many women don’t realize they are at a higher risk than their male peers, said Dr. Abhijeet Danve, a rheumatologist and faculty member in Yale School of Medicine’s rheumatology division. “Of all the patients with arthritis, almost 60 percent of them are women,” he said. Several factors likely make women more susceptible than men: biological traits, genetics and hormones, Danve said. There are more than 100 types of...

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